How to Stay Informed Without Losing Your Mind

How to Stay Informed Without Losing Your Mind

Around the election, in a desperate search for answers about our nation’s future, I found myself scrolling, reading, and watching everything I could. I was trapped in an endless pull-to-refresh cycle of consuming more news, tweets, posts, and videos than was good for me. I told myself that I was staying informed, that this was part of my civic duty—and that not staying up-to-date 24-7 would leave me politically ignorant and impotent.

I’ve since changed my mind. In fact, I’ve decided to give up consuming news online, and I think you should consider doing the same. Here’s why:

The Four People Addicting You to Technology

The suspects may surprise you.

Recently, the Pokemon Go phenomenon has reigniting the question of technology’s role in changing behavior.

To put things in perspective, I wanted to share the main points of an article I published on the topic titled, Who’s Really Addicting Us to Technology?in a slide presentation below. It’ll give you a quick rundown of the “suspects” responsible for our technology addiction.

Please let me know your feedback and if you enjoyed the slides, please share them.

Who’s Really Addicting You to Technology? Check out these slides Click To Tweet

Related articles you may enjoy:

Who’s Really Addicting You to Technology?

pablo (1)

“Nearly everyone I know is addicted in some measure to the Internet,” wrote Tony Schwartz in a recent essay in The New York Times. It’s a common complaint these days. A steady stream of similar headlines accuse the Net and its offspring apps, social media sites and online games of addicting us to distraction.

The Psychology of Notifications: How to Send Triggers that Work

Nir’s Note: This post was co-authored with Ximena Vengoechea. Ximena is a design researcher at Twitter and will be speaking at this year’s Habit Summit

iphone

In his famed experiments, Ivan Pavlov trained his dogs to associate mealtime with the ring of a bell. Pavlov found he could elicit an involuntary physical response in his dogs with a simple jingle. Every time his bell rang, the dogs began to salivate.

Today, the beeps, buzzes, rings, flags, pushes, and pings blasting from our phones prompt a similar response. They are the Pavlovian bell of the 21st century and they get us to check our tech incessantly.

However, as powerful as these psychological cues are, people are not drooling dogs. Your product’s users can easily uninstall or turn off notifications that annoy them.

What makes an effective psychological trigger?

Pin It on Pinterest

Get instant access to your

FREE OFFICIAL HOOKED WORKBOOK

Almost there! Please check your inbox to verify your email address.

Do you want to learn

HOW TO DESIGN
HIGHLY ENGAGING PRODUCTS?

Almost there! Please check your inbox to verify your email address.