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Nir’s Note: This Q&A recently appeared on the 15five.com blog and it pulled out some thoughts I’ve been chewing on regarding technology, addiction, and our relationship with the products we use. I’ve edited it slightly and hope you find it interesting.

Should We Worry About the World Becoming More Addictive?

Question: Pokémon GO is all the rage right now. Can you talk about that in the context of a habit forming product? Is it negative or positive?

Nir Eyal: We have to think of technology in the broader context of the environment that we live in. The knee jerk reaction that always occurs with a new technology is that we don’t like it. We are averse to change and fear new technologies.

Learn how to hook users to your product in 3 steps

Changing user habits isn’t easy — but understanding how to conduct Habit Testing will increase your odds of success.

In this video, I provide a brief introduction to the three steps of Habit Testing. I explain how product designers use these steps to identify their devotees, codify what makes the product habit-forming, and modify the user experience accordingly.

Let me know what you think of the video and your own experience designing user habits in the comments section below.

Find out how to get users #Hooked to your product in three steps. Click To Tweet

Also, here’s a graphic to help you remember the 3 steps to Habit Testing — Identify, Codify, and Modify. If you find it helpful, don’t forget to share it.

Learn how to hook users to your product in 3 steps

My original article can be found here:

The suspects may surprise you.

Recently, the Pokemon Go phenomenon has reigniting the question of technology’s role in changing behavior.

To put things in perspective, I wanted to share the main points of an article I published on the topic titled, Who’s Really Addicting Us to Technology?in a slide presentation below. It’ll give you a quick rundown of the “suspects” responsible for our tech addiction.

Please let me know your feedback and if you enjoyed the slides, please share them.

Who’s Really Addicting You to Technology? Check out these slides Click To Tweet

Related articles you may enjoy:

pablo

In years to come, conversations will breathe new life into software—particularly the boring enterprise tools millions of knowledge workers begrudgingly use every day. Conversational user interfaces (CUIs) work because of our familiarity with messaging. Even the most technically complex interactions can look as simple as getting an SMS text when presented as a conversation.

There are three benefits conversational user interfaces have over traditional software and we believe these lessons can inform and inspire the redesign of countless online services. To illustrate the potential of conversational interfaces, we’ve reimagined what Google Analytics, one of the most widely-used (and widely-despised) pieces of enterprise software could look like as a conversation.

Die Dashboards, Die! Why Conversations Will Reinvent Software Click To Tweet

What’s it all for anyway?

Before diving into our redesign, it is important to consider some fundamental questions. What is enterprise software for? What job does it do for the user?

Nir’s Note: This guest post is an excerpt from the new book Invisible Influence: The Hidden Factors that Shape Behavior, written by my friend and Wharton School professor, Jonah Berger.

book coverBeing different, the notion goes, is the route to success. Think different was even Apple’s motto for a period. And Apple is often held up as a poster child of the benefits of this ethos. Conventional wisdom suggests that products like the iPhone and Macintosh succeeded because they were different from the rest. Steve Jobs was a visionary because he thought different from everyone else.

There’s only one problem with this advice. It’s wrong.

In this video I discuss the psychology of sending good triggers. The video is based on an earlier post written with Ximena Vengoechea.

What do you think? What are some examples of well-timed triggers? Let me know in the comments.

You have just a few days to learn everything there is to know about a subject you know nothing about. Now what?

pablo (4)“Don’t boil the ocean,” Terry said as he slapped a tall stack of papers on my desk. “Just tell us what we need to know.”

I was staring at a serious problem. To help our firm win a multimillion-dollar consulting contract, I had five days to tell my new boss everything there was to know about airline bankruptcies. Problem was, I didn’t know the first thing about airline bankruptcies.

I barely knew the first thing about anything. It was my first month of my first job out of college, and I had no idea how I—a 23-year-old with zero existing insights on the industry—was going to tell a senior partner anything that wasn’t going to get me fired.

Nir’s Note: This guest post is an excerpt from my friend Ryan Holiday’s new book, Ego Is the Enemy. Ryan is the author of three other books and his monthly reading recommendations, which go out to 50,000+ subscribers, can be found here. 

It can ruin your life only if it ruins your character.

—Marcus Aurelius

EgoIsTheEnemy_final jacketJohn DeLorean ran his car company into the ground with a mix of outsized ambition, negligence, narcissism, greed, and mismanagement. As the bad news began to pile up and the picture was made clear and public, how do you think he responded? Was it with resigned acceptance? Did he acknowledge the errors his disgruntled employees were speaking out about for the first time? Was he able to reflect, even slightly, on the mistakes and decisions that had brought him, his investors, and his employees so much trouble?

About a year ago, I wrote an essay about how to win your competition’s customers habits.

Today, I’d like to share a quick video of the ideas in that article. Let me know what you think about this format and if you’d like to see more videos like this one…

Last week’s Habit Summit was amazing! It was wonderful to see so many blog readers and friends enjoying the keynotes — not to mention the Stanford sunshine.

Below is my opening presentation highlighting examples of companies changing user behavior for good.

Let me know if you can think of more examples in the comments section below.

BTW – If you couldn’t attend the Habit Summit, you can get a video pass to see all the talks you missed here: http://HabitSummitVideoPass.eventbrite.com